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Right Now Could be the Best Time to Come to Panama ... the Hub of the Americas

Right Now Could be the Best Time to Come to Panama ... the Hub of the Americas
Population: 3,705,246
Capital City: Panama City
Climate: Tropical maritime; hot, humid, cloudy; prolonged rainy season (May to January), short dry season (January to May)
Time Zone: GMT-5
Language: Spanish (official), English 14%; (many Panamanians are bilingual)
Country Code: 507
Coastline: 2,490 km

Right Now Could be the Best Time to Come to Panama...the Hub of the Americas

Why do so many expats choose Panama? Often the intangibles…the feel of a place…play a big role. But there are also a lot of concrete, quantifiable reasons Panama is so appealing, starting with its modern infrastructure.

Panama’s cosmopolitan capital, Panama City, is the only true First World city in Central America. The beautifully maintained Pan-American Highway runs the breadth of the country, making travel easy. High-speed Internet and cell coverage are remarkable…as are the power, air, and water quality.

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Cost of Living in Panama

Cost of Living in Panama

Panama offers a very comfortable retirement solution, in part because the nation is much more developed than most visitors expect.Many are shocked by the modernity of Panama and the clusters of skyscrapers that define Panama City’s skyline. All of the amenities one could wish for are readily available.

By moving to Panama, you will enjoy the benefits of a developing economy where you can still take a taxi across town for a buck or two, get your haircut for a couple of dollars, or enjoy dinner for two with a bottle of wine at one of the finest restaurants in Panama City for a mere $30.

Your power bill will depend on where you live. In mountain towns like Cerro Azul, you may use less electricity-many expats find they don’t need air conditioning in the cooler climes. Sea-level destinations like Panama City are very warm, and most expats in the city use air conditioning. David, on the other hand, is not in the water, so it’s known as Panama’s warmest city.

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Living in Panama

Living in Panama

Panama stands out among the world’s expat destinations because it offers solid infrastructure and First World amenities…close to North America.

And when it comes to value and variety, Panama can’t be beaten. Here, you really get what you pay for…never less. A little money can buy you a lot of luxury. And even if you’re living on a pension, life here is easy, breezy, and fun.

There are parts of Panama where one can live on $1,000 a month, all told. Places where you’ll find few cons and plenty of pros, from pretty views to friendly locals. Where you feel miles away from the First World capital—though, truly, the country is so small, you’re never far from the city. Places where you can live a good life.

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Panama Real Estate: Double the Luxury for Half the Price

Panama Real Estate: Double the Luxury for Half the Price

If you are considering a move to Panama, then you will be pleased to learn that there is a large amount of real estate for sale here. Whether you want to find a home in Panama City, a beautiful property in the mountains, or a house by the beach, Panama offers it all.

The Real Estate in Panama Is Inexpensive and Easy to Purchase

It is important to first note that most of the property you will find for sale in Panama will be much more affordable than what you may be accustomed to. Panama is regularly hailed for providing First-World luxuries at Third-World costs.

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Renting in Panama

Renting in Panama

Panama

At International Living, we always recommend that you rent before you buy. Before you plunk down money on a house or condo in a new place, stay awhile and see if suits your needs.

Rental regulations are pretty straightforward in Panama. Your landlord and you, the tenant, have the right to negotiate whatever rental amount you like, and the landlord has the right to increase rent at his discretion. Usually, your contract will indicate that either you or the landlord can break the lease at any time with a month’s notice.

So say you sign a one-year lease and six months into it, you decide you want to move. All you need to do is notify your landlord, in writing, that you’ll be moving in a month. As long as the property is still in good condition, you’re entitled to your security deposit back.

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